Ramblings of a Techno-Viking

iki

Oooh iki

As you can probably tell if you are reading this, I did eventually get my blog set up. I'm using ikiwiki and git. (Ikiwiki does both wikis and blogs.) Ikiwiki seems to be a good choice for me, but what is friendly to me differs strongly from what is friendly to other people. (For example, I find macs counterintuitive. I'm an emacs user and find vi easier to use than nano.)

I've also registered blars.us and have it pointing to my rented vserver. The biggest problem I've had on the vserver is running out of memory, I'm no longer used to only having 192MB and no swap. It's running Debian Lenny, and I installed the backported ikiwiki version.

Now that I've got ikiwiki mostly working for me, maybe I'll return to blogging on a more regular basis.

I'm sure the formatting of the pages will be changing a bit in the near future. Dates and times are in UTC, not PDT.

Posted Monday 04 October 2010 20:53 UTC
Last edited Monday 04 October 2010 21:05 UTC
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The big purge

As I am planning on moving from my (fairly small) house to an RV, I'm having to get rid of lots of stuff. Like many people, I tend to collect things, whether I'll ever use them or not.

Last Saturday I took a load to one of the LA City S.A.F.E. collection centers. I've done this in the past, but avoided doing so on the weekend since my experience with their "collection events" involved long lines. None of their permanent facilities are open on weekdays anymore, so I had to do it on the weekend. There was no line when I got there at about 9:15, and no one else arrived while I was there. I gave them a bag of dried out paint cans, about 200 alkaline batteries, a couple of empty disposable propane cylinders, a couple of dead printers, and several obsolete computers that had been raided for parts already. I'll have to do this several more times unless I find a better way of getting rid of my electronics junk. Nobody wants CRT monitors anymore, even if they work fine. (Besides the 6 electronic item limit, my car trunk doesn't hold all that much.)

Figuring some stuff might be worthwhile to sell as metal scrap, I did some googling and found that most of the top hits for "Los Angeles scrap copper" are either other search sites or out of area. One of the two actual sites had many listings. None gave any idea how much it is worth in small quantities. I eventually found a site that listed prices for container loads (40000 lb minimum) so I could at least get some clue what it's worth, figuring I'll maybe get half that. Copper is $3.60/lb, insulated wire $.90 - $3.00/lb depending, and small transformers (apparently anything under 100 lb or so) $0.45/lb. Steel and iron aren't worth bothering with in the quantities I'd have. Apparently some electronics (like processors and chips with gold-plated pins) are worth enough that a recycling firm is willing to pay FedEx shipping on them. So I should sort that stuff out before taking it to S.A.F.E.

Mostly I'm just going through large piles of stuff, sorting out to recycle (paper/cardboard/numbered plastic), trash, sell/give, and sort again later. It looks like I'll fill my recycle can (40 gal?) this week. (First time I've done that in a single week.) My shredder is also getting a large workout. I'm running into items I've never used and forgotten I purchased, and things that I knew I had somewhere but haven't been able to find for years. It's hard for a hoarder like me to put stuff I paid money for and never used in the trash, but it needs to be done and I'll never get the money back. Also hard are some things people gave me as presents (with good intentions I'm sure) but I knew I'd never use them when I received them.

Current plans for the sell/give pile include a yard sale, Craigslist, and taking a box of free stuff to the monthly Prancing Skiltaire party. I sold some of my filk books at the LAFA filk, and will try again next month.

One thing I know I'll have to deal with is books, mostly SF. The used book store I planned on selling to closed a few months ago. If I had fewer to get rid of, I could just donate to a library or LASFS, with more it would be worthwhile thinking about setting up an internet shop. Maybe I should try that anyway.

Posted Tuesday 05 October 2010 20:51 UTC
Last edited Friday 08 October 2010 06:10 UTC
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Debian

openlogo-nd-100.png One of the organizations I volunteer for is Debian. This is a Linux distribution done as totally free (as in liberty, as well as beer) software. (The BSD and Hurd efforts haven't yet produced a stable release.) No one is paid by the Debian organization, but some people are allowed to work on Debian on company time. I am one of the thousand or so "Debian Developers", but many other people contribute to the release as well.

The main thing I've been doing for Debian lately is despamming the Bug Tracking System. Each bug has half a dozen email addresses, and the addresses can be found on the web and in mailing lists. With tens of thousand of valid email addresses, the BTS gets a lot of spam. At one point it was frequently over a gigabyte of spam a day caught by our filters. Now we have better pre-delivery filters, so less spam gets to that point. Anything that makes it past the filters (mostly a tuned spamassassin) gets delivered to the bug, and I post-moderate ones with questionable scores. Such moderated messages get fed back into the baysian filters, and on occasion I add more spamassassin rules based on what is getting through.

Debian is an international group that mostly communicates via email and IRC. I sometimes answer user questions in #debian on irc.oftc.net.

Debian has an annual conference, DebConf. I've managed to make it to five out of the last six, including New York City this year, the first time it's been in the US.

Posted Wednesday 06 October 2010 21:52 UTC
Last edited Sunday 07 November 2010 04:41 UTC
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RV info and where to stay

In some ways, people who full-time in RVs have a wider variety of how they handle living than people who live in houses or apartments. Some move daily, others twice a year. Some follow good weather, some jobs, and some just explore.

Most of my research on RV living has been on the Internet. For discussions, the rv.net forums seem most active. They also illustrate how inferior forums are to Usenet newsgroups or mailing lists, but if you want to learn about a topic you need to go where the knowledgeable people are. They tend to be rather repetitive, and it's hard to figure out what you've read before due to the poor user interface. They of course follow Sturgeons Law.

Blogs I read more or less regularly

  • The Adventures of Tioga and George A retired single man, living in a 27' Class C. He's spent the past several years mostly in Mexico, but the archives have info on being in the western US. He gives information about the routine chores living in an RV, and various modifications done to the RV to make it more livable for him.

  • Travels with Miranda A single woman who travels around Canada taking various jobs. Her Class C is a bit bigger than George's, and she has a toad. (Towed vehicle) Has information on her RV modifications, jobs, and travel.

  • Technomadia A couple who live in a small travel trailer. This is more article style rather daily life. There is much good information, but not a lot on how to get jobs.

  • Small House, Big Backyard A couple with a Class A who haven't yet started fulltiming. Information on customizing the RV, and staying in Wisconsin area campgrounds. I mostly skim the family pictures and textile stuff.

  • Our Odyssey Retired couple in a converted bus, who volunteer with the Red Cross.

There are others I read as well, but those are the main ones that are both updated fairly frequently and have good information on how I plan to live.

Where to Stay

Medford, Oregon is where I plan to have my home base. This is where I grew up and my parents and remaining grandmother are still there. Oregon has no sales tax, so I can save that expense if I buy and register my RV in Oregon. Oregon does have income tax, so it might actually be cheaper to use South Dakota as my official residence.

It's possible to boondock many places in National Forests and on BLM land for two weeks at a time in any one place free. How far you need to move and how often you can return to an area seem to be up to the individual districts interpretation. There are also long term areas in BLM land where you can stay six months at a time for a fairly small fee. There is even "Slab City" where people have lived for years on public land.

Workcamping where part (or even all) of the compensation is a place to park an RV and utilities is a possibility. However, it might make more economic sense to pay for the site and get a regular job in many cases.

There are volunteer positions in many National and State parks where you can get somewhere to park an RV, utilities, and maybe a small stipend. This is something to stretch a budget and not something to live on with no other source of funds.

Some stores, truck stops, restaurants, and rest areas allow you to stay a singe night in a parking lot free. This is more for getting from one place to another rather than somewhere to live even for a short time. The gas to move around can cost more than staying in a campground.

Stealth camping on city streets is not something I plan on doing much. How legal this is varies, some places it's not legal to park an RV on the street or even in a private driveway.

A good article on places to stay free is here.

Posted Friday 08 October 2010 06:10 UTC
Last edited Friday 05 November 2010 00:34 UTC
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Shopping for an RV online

Here are online places I've found that tend to have something close to what I am looking for in an RV:

  • Craigslist Has all the advantages and disadvantages of a free ad site. Mixed personal, dealer, and scam ads. Doesn't have an index, each "city" covers only a small area. Many people don't do a good job describing their vehicle, and some obviously don't know what they have. Prices range all over. Tends to mostly have cheaper older vehicles.

  • Craiglook A search site for Craigslist ads. Allows you to search over a wider area, but depends on people puting the keyword you search for in the ad title. The search result display has more useful information than using Craigslist directly. Update Due to a disagreement with Craigslist, this site has mutated to Claz. It now no longer has craigslist ads directly, and combines several other search sites, at least one of which had craigslist ads. Unfortunately the triple indirect almost always fails and the site is not very usable anymore.

  • RV Trader Online Paid ads, mostly from dealers. The search is much more useful, since there is a database with things categorized. Lacks most of the bargains and scams found on Craigslist. Having a recent updated date does not mean the RV hasn't been sitting on the lot for months or years.

  • Ebay Motors It's Ebay with both auctions and fixed price items. I'm not going to buy an RV without looking at it and test driving.

  • update Oodle Another combined search site, but this one seems to be mostly working (except rvtraderonline listings).

For a vague idea of what an RV might be worth, based on the model and year, there is NADA guides. While many say the NADA prices are high on recent vehicles, I think they tend to be low on older ones in good shape. (Perhaps they are averaging in the ones in poor shape that I wouldn't consider buying.) The free online version does not include the wholesale prices that dealers use for tradeins and banks use for loans.

Posted Friday 08 October 2010 20:01 UTC
Last edited Friday 05 November 2010 00:34 UTC
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RV shopping checklist

When shopping for an RV, it's hard to remember all the things to look at without a list. So I created such a list, making sure to include what is important to me. It will evolve as I get more experience looking. I also recommend taking a camera, tape measure, and a notebook along when looking at a RV, so you can do a comparison later.

Here is the open-office version of my checklist so you can customize it, or if you just want to see the pdf version it's here. Creative Commons License
This work by Blars Blarson is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Since I've never purchased a used vehicle (both of my cars were purchased new), the price negotiation phase is not something I can give advice on.

So far I've only used this checklist once. The RV in question has plenty of minor issues, and is an entry level one that also has some design issues, but it is cheap. It did get me thinking about how to rearrange the bedroom for me. (It has the typical "walk around" RV queen bed, something I understand why other people like, but it is very space inefficient for a single person.) There is a chance I'll be back to this one.

There is an RV show in Pomona starting in a few days. Admission is only $1 Monday-Thursday, but parking is $9. I'm not expecting much in my price range there, but I plan on going one day to look and see what accessories are available.

Posted Wednesday 13 October 2010 15:43 UTC
Last edited Friday 05 November 2010 00:34 UTC
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Looking at Class A RVs

Over the last eight days, I took an 1800 mile road trip visiting relatives and looking at RVs with visits to a two-dealer "RV show", three private-sale RVs, and two dealers.

In the price range I'm looking at, Fleetwoods are most common. They make several Class A models, cheapest/smallest to largest/most expensive is Flair, Bounder, Southwind, Southwind Storm, Pace Arrow, Pace Arrow Coronado. Itasca is a Winnebago under a different label for marketing reasons. I haven't bothered to figure out all the Winnebago/Itasca models since I don't see many on the market.

The "show" was on a gravel parking lot, and I never saw a trace of the second dealer. (Maybe they only had towables.) It did give me a chance to look at about ten RVs in my price range, and the salesman left me alone to wander the lot. There was one I really liked the layout of, a 1999 Bounder 28T, but the price was high enough that I didn't even try to see if they would come down to my range. (I'm wondering if there is a variation of the 28T layout with two twin beds.) There were a couple of older bigger Fleetwood Class A's, but neither layout appealed to me. The other brands they had either seemed poorly made or had other issues that made them not be seriously considered.

Of the private sale RVs I looked at, the Holiday Rambler seemed well enough made, but there could have been much more storage if the designers had just made the space accessible. (This is an issue I found to a lesser extent in other RVs I looked at.) Also, the ducted heating used up quite a bit of space. There were a few issues due to the way it had been stored.

The owner of the Southwind had just about finished some upgrades he was doing to sell the RV. Not even considering the labor involved, I'd rather have had it priced cheaper by the amount spent on the upgrades. Of all the RVs I've looked at, this one was the most pristine. While a good price for what it was, it just wasn't that good a fit for me. I'd probably wind up taking out the new TV that was just being installed, and spending money on other customizations to make it fit me.

After driving over 100 miles to look at it, I found out the Rexhall had been sold while I was in-route. At least I got a chance to have a good look at it. This one had an unusual layout: king-size bed in back, L-shaped couch with the only table being convertible from coffee table to full hight with leaves to extend it. The RV did look well made.

At the dealer I went to next (B&L RV in San Pablo, CA) I never saw a salesman. The sales offices were empty. The lady in the parts department said I could look at the RVs, and of the two I had seen ads for that I was considering one I didn't find, and the other was in very poor shape, by far the worst of any I looked at. Not a dealer I'll be back to.

The next dealership I looked at (Discover RV in French Camp, CA) was a very different experience. A salesman greeted me before I got to the office, and let me look at RVs I was considering, and test-drive the one that was the best fit. For as good as the Southwind looked on the inside, I was amazed at how bad of shape the roof was in. Once I had that clue, I saw some minor discoloration on the ceiling inside. With no levelers or backup camera, tires that needed replaced due to age, the roof damage, and a price after adding all the fees more than I've got budgeted, this was not the RV for me. I should have walked out at least 1/2 hour earlier when the salesman started getting pushy.

It was defiantly a learning experience, and I'll know what to look for better in ads in the future. Damon and Georgie Boy don't seem to be well built, I probably won't look at them in the future. The Winnebago/Itasca motorhomes I saw were lower quality than I expected, and the Fleetwoods better. The only real problem I see with the Fleetwoods is the "rubber" roof, and I think that is an issue that can be lived with with a bit higher maintenance than a fiberglass roof would require.

Posted Friday 22 October 2010 15:20 UTC
Last edited Friday 05 November 2010 00:34 UTC
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RVIA show in Pomona

I went to the RVIA show in Pomona yesterday. It was drizzling when I got there, and it was colder at 4:00 in the afternoon than when the strange wet stuff was coming from the sky. The last two days for this years show are today and tomorrow.

Of the four talks that are repeated daily, I went to 2.5. (I arrived late for the first.) Ron Jones gave a talk for new RVers and one on fulltiming, where he mentioned his books and new web site. Dennis Hill gave a talk about driving an RV (mentioning the RV driving school he teaches at) and one on traveling to Alaska which I skipped. Most of the information covered in these was things I had already found out about on the internet, but I think they were worth my time. The tips on how to maneuver and park an RV could save me a lot of time in the future.

As expected, none of the RVs at the show were suitable for me. It appears there may be a show policy against used RVs. (The show is put on by a manufacturer trade organization.) I did talk to several dealers and may be contacted with possibilities. There were class A's starting at $80000, class C's starting at $50000, and towables starting at $10000. All of the class A's and most of the class C's had slideouts, with the three Lazy Daze brought being most of the ones without. While there were some combinations of features I hadn't seen before, nothing impressed me as something to spend time dreaming about. The accessories tent was pretty empty, both of products to buy and people looking. There was surprisingly little overlap in the products there.

Posted Saturday 23 October 2010 19:45 UTC
Last edited Friday 05 November 2010 00:34 UTC
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RV wish list

Musts

  • reliable drive train
  • no leaks

Wants

Many of these things can be fixed if needed, but that takes money and time. The others are things that can be lived without, but may be irritations or mean extra maintenance.

  • single-piece fiberglass or aluminum roof
  • V10 engine
  • ODB-II connector
  • Single-level floor
  • rotating passenger and driver seats
  • full-time bed
  • comfortable chair to read in
  • tires less than 4 years old
  • larger refrigerator
  • lots of storage
  • oven
  • 400 AH or more of batteries
  • 400 Watts or more of solar
  • about 30 feet (shorter is easier to park, longer has more room)
  • twin bed
  • desk to work at
  • bedroom easy to remodel (nothing under bed, etc)
  • multi-level converter/charger
  • inverter
  • no slides
  • double-pane windows
  • good insulation
  • generator
  • levelers
  • usable ladder
  • place for bicycle
  • significant usable carrying capacity
  • able to tow a car
  • glass door on shower
  • backup camera
  • used recently to detect faults
Posted Saturday 23 October 2010 22:06 UTC
Last edited Friday 05 November 2010 00:34 UTC
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Why no pictures?

While I could give the excuse my camera is old, clunky, and I've been having problems with the batteries for it (five of the six sets of four AA nimh batteries I have will no longer take a charge), but the real reason is I've gotten out of the habit of using it. Another reason is I haven't gotten into the habit of puting pictures on my blog, and it isn't my style to use random stock images from elsewhere.

The pictures I took of various RVs I looked at don't show anything you can't see by looking through ads on the various RV shopping sites. They were mostly taken for my own reference.

I did take a few pictures of an Oregon rest area between Medford and Roseburg. Upon reconsideration, I decided not to publish them with a comment comparing them to the ones in southern and central California, since it wouldn't be fair. The California rest areas see a lot more traffic (partly because they are spaced further apart -- even when there aren't a bunch closed for renovation) and the climate is not suitable for creating a pine forest. There are some nice rest areas in California -- the Lake Shasta ones and the Klamath River Highway one are examples. So I'll just use my pictures of the Cow Creek Rest Area (northbound) as a test of puting pictures on my blog. Click on the images for full size versions.

You can let me know what you think by adding a comment. All comments are currently moderated. I've only gotten one comment spam so far.

Posted Friday 29 October 2010 03:33 UTC
Last edited Sunday 07 November 2010 04:49 UTC
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My Rexhall Aerbus

In order not to jinx it, I delayed announcing anything until I had possession, but now I can say I'm the proud owner of a "1996" Rexhall Aerbus Class A motorhome. It was built in August 1995 on a 1995 Ford F53 chassis, and there is a record of the previous owner's first trip in September 1995. I haven't found any indication of the Rexhall model number, but it is quite believable that it was sold as a 1996 model.

Rexhall is a small manufacturer of Class A motorhomes located in Lancaster, California. They now only sell factory direct, and are reportedly quite willing to do custom orders. Despite going through a Chapter 11 (reorganization) bankruptcy, and laying off many of their workers, they are still in business and making motorhomes. Bill Rex is still involved in the company. There are active Rexhall owner's clubs, with the main one being a chapter of FMCA. Rexhall uses single-piece fiberglass roofs and welded steel frames. They are known for doing innovations, some of which wind up being common ("wide" 102" body), some disappear (L-shaped couch and a convertible coffee table as the only table), and at least one that other manufacturers have tried to copy but been unable to make reliable. (two "full body" slides) Most Rexhall owners have good things to say about them.

The purchase was at Cue's RV Sales in El Monte, California, about 20 miles from where I now live. The salesman (Pabel Cue) unlocked the RVs I was interested in looking at, and let me go though them at my own pace while remaining available in the office for any questions I had. I spent about three hours Monday looking mainly at the Rexhall, with a quick look through a Fleetwood Flair, then I talked with Pabel about taking a test drive. Their policy is to discuss price and get a deposit before the test drive. So I got something to eat, went home and researched about Rexhalls. Tuesday I went back and spent another three or four hours looking at it before sitting down to discuss price. That went surprisingly well, with Pabel agreeing to fix my major issues and get me out the door for a price I could live with. I left the $500 deposit and agreed to come back Wednesday for a test drive. (With a small dealer, someone has to be available to cover the office during the test drive.) The test drive went well (I didn't hit anything) and I agreed to the purchase.

Not only did they fix the major issues I mentioned, including replacing all six tires (at least one was 15 years old) and leaving me with the newest as a spare, and go through all the major systems to make sure they work, but they found and fixed a number of minor issues I hadn't bothered to mention like missing light bulbs. It took a couple of days since they needed to fix the hydraulic levelers and some of the under-hood wiring. (The front drivers-side tire may have had a blowout taking the hydraulic lines and wiring. That explains the 2008 tire there, but not leaving the 1995 tire on the passenger side when a newer spare was available.) They replaced the porch light and the radio.

The bathroom has a double-door that can be opened all the way to make a bathroom/dressing room with the large closet across the hall, or one door can be closed to make a combined bedroom and bathroom. Unfortunately it's a tight squeeze for a large person to get in the shower without opening the bathroom door. (One person moved the shower door hinge for this reason.)

The bed is large 70"x75", and may have been marketed as a king size. The accordion-style bedroom door was removed by the previous owner. This is an area I plan on doing major remodeling, puting in a twin or full-size bed and adding a desk and more storage. The three windows and under-bed water tank limit what I can do, and the drivers-side window is an emergency exit so I shouldn't block it.

There is a two-legged table that goes into holes with carpeted fillers in front of the couch. Since there is only a 2" gap between the table leg and the couch, this table would be difficult to actually use. I've got a thread on the rv.net diy forum where this is being discussed. Unfortunately, I didn't remember to take any pictures of this, maybe tomorrow.

The kitchen is large for an RV this size, with some usable counter space and a fair amount of storage. There are two sets of deep narrow shelfs, one of which I may be able to covert to a roll-out pantry. The idea on the Rexhall tips site of adding a door on the stair side to make the under-sink storage more accessible sounds good.

The table between the passenger seat and the recliner doesn't close quite all the way. I may just leave it out all the time. The passenger seat reclines, and the other chair has a footrest. Both swivel and move forward and back. I wish the chair was mounted a couple inches closer to the wall, and could go back a little more into the stairwell.

Besides the furnace and the vent ducting, there is some unusable space under the couch. With a little protection to the furnace and ducts, I think the space behind the couch could be used for storing a table, but not the current one.

Removing the CRT TV is a fairly low priority project.

Posted Saturday 30 October 2010 02:28 UTC
Last edited Sunday 07 November 2010 04:49 UTC
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RV wish list followup

Now that I have an RV, I'll see how it matches my wishlist

Musts

  • reliable drive train

Ford F53 from 1995 with a 460 V8. About as good as can be expected.

  • no leaks

Minor discoloration near the the forward air conditioner and roof vent. No indication of real damage, and the dealer replaced the seals on the air conditioners and vent.

Wants

Many of these things can be fixed if needed, but that takes money and time. The others are things that can be lived without, but may be irritations or mean extra maintenance.

  • single-piece fiberglass or aluminum roof

Yes

  • V10 engine

No

  • ODB-II connector

No

  • Single-level floor

Yes

  • rotating passenger and driver seats

Yes

  • full-time bed

Yes

  • comfortable chair to read in

Yes

  • tires less than 4 years old

Dealer replaced with all new tires

  • larger refrigerator

No. I do like the handle on this Norcold better than the Dometic ones I've seen though.

  • lots of storage

Yes

  • oven

No. It has a microwave/convection oven that would require the generator when boondocking.

  • 400 AH or more of batteries

No. I think the battery tray can be replaced to make room for four 230 AH 6V batteries though. (It curently has two.)

  • 400 Watts or more of solar

No. I think there is room on the curb side of the roof.

  • about 30 feet (shorter is easier to park, longer has more room)

Yes, 28 feet.

  • twin bed

No. I'll need to replace the king.

  • desk to work at

No. Part of the bedroom remodel.

  • bedroom easy to remodel (nothing under bed, etc)

Partial credit

  • multi-level converter/charger

No

  • inverter

No. I'll use my small ones for now.

  • no slides

Yes

  • double-pane windows

No

  • good insulation

Moderate

  • generator

Yes, 5500 watt. Bigger than most RVs this size.

  • levelers

Yes

  • usable ladder

It originally had one, but it was broken when I looked at this RV. The dealer removed the broken bottom section and first step, so I can use a step ladder to get on the remaining portion of the ladder.

  • place for bicycle

No, I'll have to add a hitch carrier, or put it in one of the basement compartments.

  • significant usable carrying capacity

Unknown, since I haven't weighed it yet.

  • able to tow a car

It should be able to.

  • glass door on shower

Yes

  • backup camera

No, I'll have to add one.

  • used recently to detect faults

The registration was up to date (September 2011), but it may not have been used much since 2008.

  • lots of basement storage

Yes

Posted Saturday 30 October 2010 15:30 UTC
Last edited Friday 05 November 2010 00:34 UTC
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More on my Aerbus

When I woke up at 5 AM to the sound of pouring rain, I remembered that I had left the roof vents open. Fortunately, not much rain got in.

It took me a while last night to figure out DS and CS in the owners manual are Driver's Side and Curb Side. Although the manual covers a number of different models on three different chassis, the wiring and plumbing diagrams are apparently the same.

All the pictures in my previous blog entry on my RV were taken on the dealer's lot before any fixes were done for me. The pictures here were taken today.

One unusual feature is this small mirror in the bedroom that folds down to a small shelf. There is a hole behind it into the closet that has wiring for a TV, I assume that it was designed to hold a 12" TV. However, it extends over the bed, so it makes it impossible to walk around that that side of the bed when the shelf is down.

This is the couch table I mentioned previously. The first two pictures show that there isn't room to get between the leg and the couch, and the plugs removed from the floor to put the legs in. The legs shown here are the replacements supplied by the RV dealer since one of the originals was missing. The replacements had to be modified since they are bigger around than the original, and don't give solid support to the table. They are also a bit too long. When the table is put on deep side to the couch, it is possible to sit at the two ends of the couch and use the table. The only ways I can figure out to sit between the legs involve feet on the couch or having someone set up the table with another person on the couch.

It is possible but not easy to access the under-couch area for storage. It involves partly puting the couch in bed mode, then lifting and pulling away the front with the furnace vents attached. There is not room beneath the couch to store the tabletop as the owners manual suggests.

There is an unexplained gap between the cupboards over the driver. There isn't over the passenger.

Strangely, the kitchen area has a wooden floor, with a small ring of carpet around it. The bathroom is carpeted. Why not do the easy-to-clean floor on all areas likely to get spills? As you can tell from the photos, I haven't removed the protective plastic from the carpet yet.

The drawers and shelfs in the center extend into the bathroom area between the shower and the second door, with the duct for the bathroom heat duct below.

The converter, breaker panel, and house DC fuses are located under the closet.

The rig is currently parked on a wide street that always has plenty of parking available, not all that close to my house. I want more practice driving it before moving it to a busier or narrower street. If you look closely, you can see I played with lowering the jacks, but didn't actually put them all down or level it. The truncated ladder and some of the many exterior scratches are shown here. This Rexhall came prescratched, with minor scratches and dings all around the RV.

Posted Sunday 31 October 2010 04:47 UTC
Last edited Sunday 07 November 2010 04:49 UTC
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